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August 19, 2010

Otsego Herald: New school book


—   From the Otsego Herald for Saturday, Aug. 18, 1810

NEW SCHOOL-BOOK

H. & E. Phinney, Jun. (Proprietors of the Copy-Right) have just Printed, and now offer for Sale at their Book-store, by the 100, dozen, or less quantity of a new and useful work, called, The Columbian Reader, containing a new & choice collection of Descriptive, Narrative, Argumentative, Pathetic, Humorous and Entertaining Pieces, Together with Speeches, Orations, Addresses and Harangues. To which is added, A new collection of Dialogues. Designed for the use of Schools.

Note: Merchants, and others, will be furnished with the above Book, by the dozen, at the usual price of the Preceptor. It is believed that those who will take the pains to procure and peruse the Reader, will be well satisfied as to the merit and arrangement of the Book, for the use of Schools. August 11.

COMMENT: I have a copy of the second edition, published in 1811, and apparently identical with the first, except for the correction of typographical errors. It states that the first edition was printed in an edition of 4,000 copies, and that 12,000 copies are to be printed of the second.

It contains 226 pages, and includes a wide variety of quotations, from one to three pages, from mostly British sources.

My copy originally belonged to Alvah McCollom (1803-1884), a farmer in New Lisbon, who wrote on the fly-leaf ``Alvah McCollom’s Property.

These are to forbid all persons writing in this Book or making any marks whatever or tearing or damaging it in any way.’’

Alvah may have been a son of James McCollom, who was the first schoolteacher in New Lisbon.

Alvah apparently passed his reader on to his youngest daughter, Elizabeth C. Mc- Collom (born 1852) who, in 1865 and at the age of about 13, inserted in the book a slip of paper demonstrating her excellent handwriting, On it she has written: ``The donation for Mr. Wales is to be Friday evening, Dec. 22nd,’’ followed by ``This is a specimen of my hand writing,’’ eleven times, and then by the alphabet in both lower case and upper case letters.

On the back is written ``Miss Elizabeth C. McCollom, New Lisbon, Otsego Co., New York’’ and ``Miss Charlotte Chapin, New Lisbon, Otsego Co., New York.’’ Charlotte was a little older than her friend Elizabeth, having been born in 1848.

Kill the Dogs!

Boston, August 7. Mad Dogs.

It is said that many dogs in this town, yesterday, discovered evident symptoms of madness.

Would it not be well for the inhabitants to follow the example of the people of Billerica, who, it is said, last week made a general slaughter of the dogs in that place, on the appearance of madness among them.

One mad dog in Dorchester, it is said has done more than one thousand dollars damage.

At best, in this town they are become a great nuisance, and surely the safety of one human life ought to be preferred to the whole species of this loathsome and dangerous animal.