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October 25, 2012

Paranormal acts spook Cooperstown

(Continued)

Ghostly sightings have also taken place at The Farmers’ Museum, where several tales are told during the “Things that go Bump in the Night’’ guided, lantern-lit tours. The museum will host the hour-long tours every half hour starting at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 26; and Saturday, Oct.27.

Museum interpreters will lead tours around the grounds and recount the mysteries and ghostly happenings that have occurred in the museum’s historic village. The tales will be adapted from the Louis C. Jones’ collection of regional folk tales, “Things That Go Bump in the Night.”

Reservations are required, and can be made by calling 547-1452. Admission is $10 per person, ages 3 and older.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum has always been home to living history, but the ghost hunters tried to find ghosts from the past while there.

Findings were revealed in a sixth season Ghost Hunters’ episode.

According to interviews with HOF President Jeff Idelson used in the show, there have been a few signs of paranormal activity at the museum. For example, Idelson said visitors have heard voices coming from the 19th Century Gallery, but nothing has been seen. He said one visitor and his family heard voices that sounded like Ted Williams’ that said to “persevere, to have courage, to excel and be great” coming from overhead while viewing an exhibit featuring the hall of famer. Idelson said it was emblematic of how Williams was late in his career.

What makes it unique is there are no audio or video monitors in the area, Idelson said on camera.

Idelson said visitors have said they have heard male voices perhaps from the hall of famers, coming from the plaques in the Plaque Gallery.

HOF Communications Director Brad Horn told investigators one employee said when vacuuming the rotunda, she would get a really strong feeling that someone was standing right over her shoulder. Every time she stopped the vacuum, put it upright and turned, nobody was there, he explained.

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