Baseball Hall of Fame compiles civil rights web collection

As protests against systemic racism continue across the country, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum bolstered its educational offerings centered around the history of baseball and the civil rights movement Thursday, June 11.

A media release from the museum included a link to a web page at baseballhall.org/civilrights that includes a timeline of the civil rights movement and baseball’s place within it, along with a collection of other Hall of Fame resources related to the subject.

“The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum believes it is critical that conversations about social injustice and inequality continue within our society and beyond,” a press release from the museum said.

“In strengthening our commitment, today we launched a comprehensive educational resource that will further elevate the history of Baseball and Civil Rights in America. We remain dedicated to presenting the history of baseball’s role in social change.”

Baseball’s history largely reflects the nation’s ongoing struggle with racial inequality, with legendary players Jackie Robinson and Hank Aaron marking two of the most memorable stories of racism in the sport.

There are also known racists among the ranks of those enshrined in the Hall of Fame’s plaque gallery, perhaps most notably Ty Cobb, who is one of the five players in the first class of players inducted into the Hall of Fame.

Since 1997, the museum has featured a permanent exhibit called “Pride and Passion: The African-American Baseball Experience,” dedicated to chronicling the experiences and contributions of black people in the sport. In 2009, the permanent “Viva Baseball!” exhibit was introduced to tell the story of Latin Americans in baseball.

Further content about black and Latin American ballplayers can be found on the museum’s website.

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