MacDougall

The Otsego Herald for March 27, 1820, compiled, with comments:

Rejection of NYC offering

NEW YORK, 12th March, 1820

Sir — It is incumbent on me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 18th February, with an extract from ... the proceedings of the Council of Savanna and the return of the contributions of this city remitted to you for the relief of sufferers by the late fire at Savannah. ...

I think it my duty to mention to you some facts which I think will satisfy every one, that bad motives have been most unjustly imputed to those concerned in this transaction on our part. ...

It was also observed by many that the circular of the Mayor of Savannah of the 13th of January seemed intended by an eloquent display of the former advantages and splendor of the city, to ask aid for its restoration, rather than to awaken our sympathy for the distress of those who must have been left destitute by the late calamity. ...

Many of the collectors gave assurances to donors that they would endeavor to induce the committee to take measures which might prevent the donations from being disposed of contrary to the wish of the contributors. When the committee met, the resolution which has been the subject of such severe animadversion was proposed and unanimously passed. ...

The resolution imposes no restriction or condition —. ... If ... your fellow-citizens should understand your letter to me, and perceive the injurious imputations it conveys, they will think there is a severity in its language which even its eloquence cannot excuse. ...

Please to receive assurances of the respect which I have the honour to be, your obedient humble servant.

CADWALLADER D. COLDEN.

(To) The Honorable THOMAS U.P. CHARLTON, Mayor of Savannah.

COMMENT: For the relevant texts, see the issue of March 20. New York’s mayor, however anxious to defend New York City’s donation to the sufferers in Savannah, makes no attempt to defend the specific words, such as that its donation should be spent without consideration of color, which had caused the most consternation in slave-holding Savannah, Georgia.

Savannah sufferers

In consequence of the extraordinary conduct of the municipal authority of the city of Savannah, in returning the donation sent from New York, because a morsel of comfort was intended for the distressed blacks, a motion has been made in the Pennsylvania legislature to rescind the resolution of that body, making an appropriation of $10,000 for the same purpose. The motion however, was negatived 49 to 38.

We observe, by the Connecticut Mirror, that Mr. Michael Bull, an active philanthropist of Hartford, who has taken considerable pains to collect articles for the relief of those distressed people, has advertised to the donors to call or send for whatever they have deposited, ‘as he declines forwarding them, lest he should incur the odium of scattering “firebrands” or be stigmatized a “traitor or demagogue.”

— Albany Gazette

Missionary to Hawaii (Sandwich Islands)

Letter from the Rev. Hiram Bingham to the Rev. Dr. Worcester, dated, on board brig Thaddeus, lat. 28, long. 20 W.

Rev. and Dear Sir, We are now cheered ... to tell you how graciously the Lord has dealt with us thus far on our way to the “isles of the Gentiles,” We have been tried with contrary winds ... and some of us with sea sickness most of the time. ... I was sick more than 30 days, though not severely. ... I was not confined to my couch a single day, but was unfit for any business. ...

I ... rejoice that ... the Lord ... has ... allowed us to engage in an enterprise, which we trust will result in giving the blessings of civilization and Christianity, to a nation now perishing in the darkness and pollution and wretchedness of idolatry. ...

Mrs. (Sybil) Bingham was but slightly affected with the common complaint, for two or three days, since which time, I have every day had ... the comfort and aid of such a companion. ...

Our morning and evening devotions are uniformly pleasant We have twice joined with the Churches of Christ in the monthly concert of prayer. ... We also joined our friends in Massachusetts in observing the annual Thanksgiving, in some measure. ...

On the Sabbath, we have a meeting in the forenoon for prayer and singing, and for reading and expounding the Scriptures in the cabin, and in the afternoon for preaching on deck. I am, in haste, Yours, H. BINGHAM

COMMENT: Hiram Bingham (1789-1869) arrived on the Island of Hawaii in 1820, and sailed on to Honolulu in 1823. He baptized Queen Ka’ahumanu and six high chiefs. Prostitution and drunkenness were banned, and Hawaii prospered. He created a spelling system for the Hawaiian language, and translated several books of the Bible into it. He designed the Kawaiahao Church in Honolulu, one of the oldest in Hawaii. He opposed Catholicism. He was recalled to America in 1840, where he became pastor of an African-American church. He is buried in New Haven.

Presidential wedding

MARRIED, on Thursday evening last, in the City of Washington, (at the White House) by the Reverend Mr. Hawley, SAMUEL LAWRENCE GOUVERNEUR, Esq. of New York, Miss MARIA HESTER MONROE, youngest daughter of JAMES MONROE, President of the United States;

COMMENT: Rev. William Dickinson Hawley (1784-1945) was the Episcopal Rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square (Washington, D.C.), otherwise known as the Church of the Presidents, where he served from 1817 to 1845.

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